EU May Withdraw From Nuclear Deal; US Patience with Iran Not Inexhaustible, says Saudi Arabia

The European Union privately warned Iran that it will start withdrawing from the nuclear deal if Tehran goes ahead with plans to further reduce its commitment to the nuclear deal. The E.U.’s warning signals that the deal is on the verge of death. The E.U. also said that if Iran makes another move away from the deal, it will put the issue of Iran’s non-compliance to the test by invoking the deal’s formal dispute resolution mechanism. Reported by The Guardian. Read more…

Iran’s president Hassan Rouhani told his cabinet that while Tehran had been willing to end its stand-off with the U.S. over Iran’s nuclear program, on terms set out by France at the U.N., Donald Trump was not prepared to make public an apparent private offer to lift sanctions. Rouhani’s claim came about the time Iran’s supreme leader, the Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, made a harsher pronouncement that Iran would continue to reduce its commitments to the 2015 nuclear deal. Iran has already reduced commitments three times. Rouhani, however, insisted that a diplomatic solution to the crisis was not yet closed, and thanked France’s president Emmanuel Macron for his efforts. Reported by The Guardian. Read more…

Meanwhile, U.S. patience with Iran is not inexhaustible, says Saudi Arabia, warning that military options are still on the table as a possible response to the Iranian-backed attack on Aramco oil facilities in September. The gulf kingdom’s Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Adel al-Jubeir, says that a U.N. commissioned report on the attack is due soon. He also said that an E.U. statement earlier in the week attributing responsibility to Iran was “very significant.” Speaking on the margins of the U.N. General Assembly in New York, al-Jubeir stated, “We want to mobilize international support, and we want to look at a whole list of options – diplomatic options, economic options and military options – and then make the decision.” Reported by The Guardian. Read more…