World Commemorates International Holocaust Remembrance Day

On January 27, 2021, the world officially commemorated the six million Jewish men, women, and children who were murdered by the Nazis and their collaborators during the Holocaust. International Holocaust Remembrance Day went online this year due to the Covid-19 crisis. A wide range of events and online exhibitions took place staged by the United Nations, the Yad Vashem World Holocaust Remembrance Center, Israel’s Foreign Ministry, the European Union, and other international organizations. Reported by The Jerusalem Post. Read more… Yad Vashem created an online exhibit, “My Lost Childhood,” discussing the horrors child survivors faced after being liberated. Reported by The Jerusalem Post. Read more… Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu delivered a video address remembering those who were murdered, warning that “if people thought that following the horrors of Auschwitz and Treblinka, humanity would finally learn its lesson and rid itself of antisemitism, that it would throw it into the dustbin of history where it belongs, well, they were wrong. Dead wrong.”  Netanyahu went on to say, “In the twenty-first century, the disease of antisemitism continues to contaminate and spread. It can be found alive, kicking and pernicious on North American university campuses, in South Asian madrassas, among European elites. Antisemitism exists in the affluent West and in the developing world in the East.” But he also said that things were different today—Jews were no longer homeless, stateless, or defenseless, but were today “firmly rooted in our ancient land, free and strong in our independent state.” Reported by Israel National News. Read more… Pope Francis also offered a warning, saying, “To remember also means being careful because these things can happen again, starting with ideological proposals that claim to want to save a people but end up destroying a people and humanity.” Continuing, the Pope said, “Be wary of how this path of death, extermination and brutality started,” a reference to the rise of the Nazi party on a wave of extreme nationalism. Reported by The New York Post. Read more… Gilad Erdan, the Israeli Ambassador to the United States and Permanent Representative of Israel to the U.N. wrote in an opinion piece on Fox News that “the similarities between the Islamic Republic and the Nazi regime of Iran are striking as the path we are heading down nearly a century later.” He said that “Iran is dominated by an irrational, extremist ideology, with a single totalitarian party that executes its opponents and has succeeded in controlling every aspect of life in its country,” and noted its expansionist ambitions in the Middle East “closely mirror that Nazi’s efforts to take over Europe.” He warned that the main difference between the Nazis and Iran is that today Iran is closer than ever to obtaining nuclear weapons, something the Nazis did not have. Reported by Fox News. Read more…